Date of Award

Spring 4-5-2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)

First Advisor

Sue Conger, Ph.D

Second Advisor

Heather Kissack, Ph.D

Third Advisor

Blake Frank, Ph.D

Abstract

Based on extant literature, job crafting research had two schools of thought, not yet related – one was that job demands and job resources are balanced through job crafting and the other was that individuals seek physical, cognitive, and relational improvements through job crafting. This research sought to relate the two types of job crafting to determine if both methods were not mutually exclusive, but rather reciprocally related. Therefore, the research for this dissertation filled a research gap by conducting a cross-sectional field survey to explore to what extent there was a reciprocal relationship between job crafting techniques and job demands-resources’ job crafting. Data were collected and split into two data sets to conduct exploratory (n=146) and confirmatory (n=147) analyses. Hypotheses were tested and supported by using partial least squares structural equation modeling. This research adds value to businesses by showing that the two approaches actually overlap a great deal and can be thought of together in the conduct of job crafting. Future research is required to determine how best to combine the two approaches most effectively to conduct job crafting.

Included in

Business Commons

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