Date of Award

Winter 2021

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)

First Advisor

Dr. Dale Fodness

Second Advisor

Dr. Sue Conger

Abstract

Open innovation ecosystems have been found to contribute to the success of economic development at the municipal level, yet there is little research on the factors driving innovative behavior within a municipal innovation ecosystem (MIE). Drawing upon the diverse literature of endogenous growth theory, complexity, and innovation, this study explores how the interpersonal and intrapersonal resources of the individuals involved contribute to innovative behavior within a city’s economy. This mixed-methods case study collects a mix of interview, observational, and survey data. After qualitative insights from MIE participants were gathered, the resulting data was used to develop and test hypotheses about the relationships between the constructs of social capital, human capital, well-being, institution engagement, and innovative behavior.

This study focused on building a novel framework that examined innovative behavior in a city-region. The moderated mediation model was tested using PLS-SEM. The results of this study highlight the importance of individual well-being in an MIE and raises awareness that idea sharing via social capital and institution engagement leads to innovative behavior in a city region. This study contributes to innovation research by suggesting that innovative behavior is impacted by more than the typical factors of affect, trait, personality, and environment, which have been the focus of research on individual level innovation.

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